Insight

Logo Design Fundamentals. Here’s where it all begins…

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Design Insight – Color Theory

Nic
Spring 2015
The colors we choose for a new logo have an effect on the overall feel of the design and the brand overall. It is important to understand the connotations these decisions have in a broad sense, beyond simply what colors our stakeholders prefer. Please view the posts on warm, cool, and other colors for insights on specific hues.
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Color Theory – Cool Colors

Nic
Spring 2015
This post focuses on the cool end of the color wheel, from blue to green and purple. Cooler colors tend to calm their audience and visually recede into the background. Check out the other posts on color theory and see what effect color choice may have on your logo.
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Color Theory – Other Colors

Nic
Spring 2015
This post explores the colors that don’t appear on a standard color wheel. Achromatic, or tones without color, brown and pink are highlighted, along with their inherent positive and negative traits. Check out the other posts that focus on warm or dark colors for more information about what effect color choice may have on your logo.
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Color Theory – Warm Colors

Nic
Spring 2015
This post explores the warm section of the color wheel, namely red, yellow and orange. Warmer colors tend to stimulate the viewer and visually advance or appear more active than their cool counterparts. Check out the other posts on color theory and see what effect color choice may have on your logo.
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Insight – Type Classification

The typeface we choose for your logo speaks with a voice independent from the words it is comprised of. Each font is different, but certain characteristics can place it into groups that share an overall mood or feel. Classifying typefaces it not an exact science, but is useful for finding fonts that transmit the desired tone.
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Typography – Sans Serif

Nic
February 19, 2015

Sans Serif type faces are the most commonly used style for logo design. They are characterised by their lack of decorative flourishes at the end of their strokes. When used in the proper application, they are non-offensive but may not command much attention due to their common appearance. They partner well with simple pictoral logos and can be a good starting point when conducting initial logo experimentations.

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Typography – Serif

Nic
February 19, 2015
Serif fonts are some of the oldest typefaces in use, and were the style of type used by the first printing press operators. They were designed to mimic the ancient, chiseled type of roman times, where serifs were used to neaten the end of chiseled lines. There longstanding use gives them a traditional, time-honored feel. They were designed for print use, and as a result, have fallen out of favor as we move more and more toward viewing type on screens.
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Typography – Hand Crafted

Nic
February 19, 2015
Hand crafted type families differ from both Serif and Sans Serif type, in that they show evidence of the tools used to create them. Wide, flat pens were originally used to create Blackletter type, while broad brushes give the Scripts their calligraphic flair. Chiseled type obviously was originally created with a hammer and chisel, and Graphic type has a unique, human quality that stems from their creators’ hands through their computer, in a distinctly handmade manner.